The Inaugural EVEHermit Competition

In recognition of my 2 years of EVE blogging, and the imminent creation of my own Alliance, I am going to run a small competition.

On offer – your choice of one of

. My favorite fit PVE Retribution
. My preferred fit Exploration Buzzard
. A T2 passive tanked PVE Osprey Navy Issue

The value of each works out very roughly at a bit over 50M. It will be delivered anywhere in Empire (no islands please), contracted by my main, from my Alt Corp in its new Alliance. Knowledge you can choose to ignore or grief, or whatever takes your fancy.

(Note the fits of the Buzzard and Retribution will probably require fairly well trained pilots. You might need to downgrade some items to T1, or go for the Osprey if your SP levels are low. I give no guarantee that you won’t be laughed at if killed flying these fits.)

The competition part? Come up with a suggestion for my new Alliance name. Truth be told I already have something suitably lame worked out, but I am certainly open to suggestions. I will select the most suited for a Risk Adverse Carebear EVE Hermit, or which make me laugh, and randomly pick one of them. The competition winner will be announced and prize delivered some time next weekend (February 9/10th).

(I am mindful this could end up resulting in the embarrassing sound of crickets – so I am relying on some of the regular posters to at least throw me a life line. 🙂 )

Mining PVP

SynCaine had an interesting post on one of my pet topics – the complexity of the player interactions in EVE. It is worth a read.

http://syncaine.com/2013/02/01/the-difficulty-of-depth/

I’ve remarked before about how Trade and Manufacturing are in my definition very much player v player, just without so many explosions. I’ve also said how Exploration also has a real Player v Player aspect – hunting and competing for limited resources, sometimes with rushes to get to cans or faction drops first.

Back before Asteroid belts respawned daily, there was competition between players in mining. It was not uncommon to have a rush after downtime to attack just refreshed belts, or after a couple of days find you had to travel a couple of systems to find a full belt to work on.  I wonder what could be done to re-introduce some of that type of mining PvP. (Sometimes it seems that too much attention is focused on explosions in EVE – and while they are a critical part of the game, putting them on a pedestal as the be all and end all can take focus away from the rest of the game.)

The sort of thing I am thinking about:

. End the fully automatic daily re-spawn of belts

. Halve the size of most Belts

. Belts are no longer in a static position – once a belt is cleared, it despawns and a new beacon appears in a different location. (Concord opening up a new public belt)

. Belts have to be cleared fully to respawn – although anything 85/90% cleared will be automatically respawned at downtime

It would need polish – but belt ratting can continue as it was before, and miners have to move around more and make decisions on when and if they trigger belt respawns, or just take the choicest rocks and hope someone else clears up the scrap to get a new belt.

Why not make it even more interesting? Add a module to the game that can hide / mask an Asteroid Belt Beacon? Maybe you have to pay CONCORD a tax to use it in High Sec? The belt can still be scanned down (via probes), but it gives a miner another method of trying to keep a resource to themselves for a little longer.

Throw ICE belts into the same sort of mix – although you would have to limit them to only a few asteroids so that they would actually respawn. Or maybe CONCORD brought in Titians and doomsday all the huge ice rocks, so now there are small fragments all over the place.

Note the above does makes mining a little safer in some aspects – or at least makes the gankers work harder at it. That is not actually my goal. It is – with as simple a mechanism as possible, to make the asteroid resources have a little more player v player aspect to them. It also doesn’t make the mechanism of mining all that much more interesting, although might make it a little harder for bots.

No Coincidence

I’m rather casual with my trade and manufacturing. Every so often I will eyeball history in some subsection of the market, and use a spread sheet and price check alts in the trade hubs to identify possibly profitable areas.

One of the more recent areas I identified was that there were no Survey Probes on the market in my region – and hadn’t been for some time. I put up some test batches with high profit margins, and was surprised that these turned over reasonably well. I had the market all to myself for a couple of weeks, but then was hit by 3 or 4 people joining in competition.

This has happened to me so many times over the years that I don’t believe it is always a coincidence. Now that I am dabbling in some of the EVE related 3rd party industry tools, I am finding some provide reports on the most profitable items to manufacture based on all sorts of definable restrictions, such as by region. It wouldn’t surprise me if people just hit a refresh button once a week on a report, and survey probes popped up in my region as returning margins of 100%+.

Is this kind of cheating – or just being smarter than I have been?

My foray into T1 Logistic Frigates was not really worth the effort. So many people did this that the market is still priced well below the new build costs, and the competition rather high on very low volumes.  I am being more aggresive on my pricing to try and clear some of the stock.  The T2 Logistic Cruisers have fared a little better – aside the never loved Augoror, which mostly languish unsold.  I also updated my pricing on these.  I won’t make a loss, but it could hardly be considered worth the effort.

I have been reasonably happy with how the stock of containers is running down. Interestingly given the relatively high margins on most of them, people have not moved in with lower priced stock. If anything they are pricing them even higher.

Overall January was a good month in my little backwater. I made 1B ISK in profit – which is the equivalent of 1/3 of my 2012 profits, and all of my 2011 profits. On top of that I picked up two months of POS fuel at 1/2 price, and a year of heavily discounted Star Base Charters.  All while Real Life was being painful.